Showing posts with label Auto. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Auto. Show all posts

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

1977 to 1979: The Years of the Lincoln Mark V

Lincoln Continental Mark V de 1978 - Photo: Flickr
From the year 1977 and up until the year 1979, the Lincoln Mark V was sold by Lincoln, the luxury division of the Ford Motor Company. The Lincoln Mark V was sold and marketed as a large coupe. It was only during the mentioned model years did the Lincoln Mark V have the opportunity to roam the streets. 

Looking at it, the Lincoln Mark V was just like the previous Lincoln Mark IV, only this time it held a coupe of refinements and received a couple of restyling. The previous vehicle sported a rounded design. The Lincoln Mark V now was built and constructed to be more square and was sharper when it came to its edges. This was perhaps due to the fact that during that time, the sharp-edged look was the in thing in the automobile world. Also, instead of the 460 cubic inches Ford 385 engine, the Lincoln Mark V was equipped with the Ford 400 cubic inch small block engine. The vehicle was also crafted to be much more angular, longer, and pretty much lower than its predecessors. It was given more trunk space and was much lighter compared to the Lincoln Mark IV. In fact, it only weighs 4,650 pounds which were some 500 pounds lighter. It was crafted on a wheelbase that measured some 120 inches. With that, the car was then completed to be much longer. It was stretched to 230 inches. In short, the Lincoln Mark V was a reskinned Lincoln Mark IV. 

However, this vehicle had its own drawbacks, thus the very reason why it existed for such a short period of time. In 1978, it was tested by Auto Motor Und Sport which was Germany’s leading car magazine. When the results came out, the magazine found out that the Lincoln Mark V had an average mile per gallon of not more than 7. Even up to this day, this vehicle still holds the Auto Motor Und Sports record for being the least fuel-efficient vehicle. This actually brought the Ford Motor Company very close to violating the Corporate Average Fuel Economy laws during that period. 

People who were interested in purchasing the said vehicle would have to have at least $11,396 so as to be able to own one. Aside from this, the Lincoln Mark V’s customers and patrons were given options like a couple of trim levels for choices. Also, this line of vehicles was given to a couple of designers. These designers – Givenchy, Bill Blass, Cartier, and Pucci – were given the chance to personally design these vehicles.




Friday, February 23, 2018

1967-68 Shelby GT-500: When Shelby's 'Stangs Moved From Race Grid to Cruise Strip

Shelby GT 500 - Photo: Flickr
Let's face it, some like their performance cars raw, some like them with a healthy dose of seasonings and side dishes. And sometimes a machine's recipe evolves from one style to the other.

That was certainly the case with one of ex-racer Carroll Shelby's most famous cars. For 1965, he began production of hopped-up Mustangs at his shop in California. For those first couple years, his 'Stangs, called GT-350s, were barely-disguised competition tools. 

With a road-racing suspension setup, high-strung small-block V8, and lack of a backseat on which to haul buddies, those original GT-350s weren't a popular pick with the burger-joint crowd. And that was fine with Ford, at least at first -- Shelby's cooperation on the Mustang was initially sought to give competition credibility to Ford's pioneering pony car, which GT-350s did handily by winning sports-car races. 

But starting with the '67 model year, Ford began expecting Shelby's machines to speak to a more mainstream performance crowd -- the typical muscle-car buyer. 

Signaling this shift toward street appeal over race-track prowess were mandatory power steering and power brakes, along with a number of optional comfort and convenience features, including air conditioning, tilt steering wheel, and tinted glass.

And, perhaps most importantly, a backseat was now standard.

But despite the added weight of such amenities, Shelby's machines hadn't lost their bite. Although the base GT-350's V8 was now somewhat tamer, that model for '67 was joined by the new GT- 500, powered by a torquey 428-cid big-block V8 rated at 360 hp.

For '68, the GT-500 packed an even bigger wallop, with the midyear introduction of the GT-500KR "King of the Road," which had a 428 that was some 40 hp stouter yet. Also that year, the Shelby Mustang's fastback body style was joined by a convertible, to further appeal to the boulevard cruising set.
Development and production of Shelbys continued along similar lines into the next generation of Mustangs, ending in 1970.



Today, muscle-car fans are divided on which of the Shelby Mustangs are the greatest -- the almost race-ready early versions, or the punchier, plusher, more street-appropriate later ones. Regardless, any flavor of Shelby Mustang is counted among the great performance cars, a fact clearly reflected in the hefty prices these cars command nowadays.

Author: David Bellm



Thursday, October 12, 2017

Every Man Needs A TRUCK

Pickup - Photo: Pixabay
There are a few things in life that I'm quite sure of. I guess I have learned along the way and become convinced about more things as I've gotten older. For example, I am convinced that work is a normal and important part of life. Twenty years ago I thought I could somehow be the first person to make it through life without working. I've also realized that relationships are harder than anything else in life, but they are also the most valuable. 

My early years were about anything but relationships. Being married for the past fifteen years has only increased my learning curve about the things I'm sure of. I have always thought that men were different than women, but it took getting married for me to really be sure that they are. I've also become quite sure that every man needs a truck.

I remember hearing things growing up about how every man needs a truck to own and drive, but I never really believed it was true. I believed that men said they needed a truck just so that they would have an excuse to actually buy a truck and drive one. I've been around a lot of men in the past couple of decades and I'm quite sure that there is something actually tied between being a man and having a truck.

A truck has become the symbol of masculinity to me, for better or for worse. I feel a little weird anytime I see a woman driving a truck around town. I immediately feel like she must just be borrowing her husband's truck for the day, but then I immediately wonder why she would want to do that. I, for example, have never had the desire to own a truck or even to drive a truck. My husband has owned a truck since before we were married and so I have had my fair share of time in a truck and I still don't see the appeal. I simply see that my husband comes alive when he gets in his truck, cleans his truck, or starts talking about his truck with anyone who will listen. His truck has truly become his favorite possession and his pride and joy.

So women, let the men in your life get a truck. It will help them feel like a man. And men, if you've always been longing for a truck but haven't had the guts to make the purchase, let today be the day. Any size and kind of truck will do, just get one and start enjoying the fact that every man needs a truck.




Wednesday, October 11, 2017

The 1966 Pontiac GTO

The 1966 Pontiac GTO - Photo: Wikimedia
What is the most popular muscle car of all time that goes zero to sixty in 6.5 seconds flat? 

The answer is the 1966 Pontiac GTO which is a choice muscle car. In fact, when it was released, it quickly became the best selling muscle car of all time. With the ’66 GTO, Pontiac truly created a new masterpiece that has remained in high demand amongst muscle car enthusiasts for nearly four decades. 

The ’66 GTO has incredible features. Most notable are the unique headlights and the exceptional contours throughout the body that are the true definition of the term sleek. Of course, being a muscle car, the ’66 Pontiac GTO came in a variety of colors and styles when it was produced including the sports coupe model, the hardtop coupe, and the convertible. 

If you are shopping for a ’66 Pontiac GTO muscle car, it is probably useful for you to know that the hardtop coupes are the most common, followed by the convertibles. Comparably, there were a lot fewer sports coupe models made, so they are by far the rarest. 

Pontiac’s GTO line gained popularity with the release of their 1964 model with its racy style, its powerful V8 engine, and its dual exhaust system. Though it had phony hood scoops, it was definitely a muscle car with an attitude. The ’66 model had a lot of the same features as the ’64, but being the second body style for Pontiac’s GTO line, it redefined style with pizzazz.

The ’66 GTO most commonly has a four-barrel 389 engine, but there was also a tri-power option. After its release, Pontiac added an XS Ram Air package to the tri-power engine giving it a hotter cam and greater power – close to 380 hp – truly ideal for a muscle car. The XS Ram Air package upgrade included the cam and stiffer valve springs along with an accessory pack that enabled the decorative hood scoop to be converted into a functional cold-air induction system. There are very few 1966 Pontiac GTOs that have the XS Ram Air setup, so they are definitely unique muscle cars for a muscle car collector. 

In regard to muscle cars, there are many that are strongly desired by muscle car enthusiasts. The 1966 Pontiac GTO just happens to be a favorite for many. Style, performance, and originality are among the traits that make the 1966 Pontiac GTO one of the hottest muscle cars around.

Author: Jason Tarasi